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Whaladaj

Figures endowed with the whole mastery of a skilful draughtsman and painter, apparently ordinary, strike with some peculiar details: deformed features of faces, morbidly glowing eyes, pathetic gestures. The inscriptions - titles
accompanying the works leave us no doubt. They are 'charming' macabresgues which could successfully be compared to grotesque portraits and illustratipns to 'the book of nonsense' of each epoch.
Where can we find the artistic roots of such a perception of the world? In spite of the appearances, probably not in surrealism because its surprising
deformations and combinations are submitted to the rigors of a doctrine based on the conscious reversing of meanings and contexts. In Wieslaw Haladaj's art perhaps more important are connections with 'romantic' approach to art, with searching for a purely 'inner' or personal model of artistic expression and a more spontaneous, passionate perception of the world. Also with existential reflections and expressionism which is a contemporary continuation of Romanticism. The elements of the described world would rather be rooted in imagination typical of tales and myths and would be the expression of the need of penetrating the other, darker side of human psyche, the land full of both fears and passions. This is the reason for the omnipresent biologism, the play of instincts and destiny in these works. The author does not deliberate on the meaning of the created visions leaving it to the observer. Although we can find some traces of the anecdote that could be described verbally, the mood, atmosphere, expression become significant. We feel that the compositions have an extradiscursive
character and respond to the changing psychical states, individual associations of personal sensitivity. They grow out of imagination, they arę expressions of emotions, serve to decrease tension. In a sense they are also artistic manifestations of the artisfs uniqueness, the will of being himself, the affirmation of proud individualism.
The nonrational and filled with fear character of Wiesław Haladaj's art is also expressed by 'barbaric" exposure of horror vacui. The effect is filling the surfaces with the expressive 'cuts', condensing textures, more and more painful breaking through the sphere of darkness to the sphere of light. All this happens - like in the old days of artisans -with the high technical quality and skill. As Haladaj does not tend to contemporary trends, what he does is a kind of challenge to many created in a programmed hurry and at the same time careless works of 'contemporary' art. Wiesław Haladaj is inclined to the reality of recent art only in rejecting the traditional aesthetic values and does not search for the traditionally understood 'beauty'. Although far be it from us to form any generalisations, it is worth mentioning that such an attitude and expressionistic
sensitivity would explain subjectivism of this art, accenting psychical force, presenting reality at the moment of its appearance, exposing obsessive themes, a tendency to deformation, grotesgue and macabre but also monumentalism of forms, distinct drawing and inclination for contrasts. Wieslaw Haladaj's compositions are dramatic, mostly based on dynamics of diagonals, diffusing and crossing the lines that shape forms and expressing the interactions of tensions. Even if - like in Yantra -the general truths are to be expressed and inner peace is to be attained and when the composition becomes symmetrical, the process of overcoming chaos and creating a new form takes place in the stormy whirls of the matter drawing towards the centre wffich orders and absorbs energy.
At the time of many disasters, loads of misery exposed by media, such values as the eternal menace, the expression of primal fear should be respected. At the time of open Information and
brashness of media what is not definitely examined and verbalised is desirable. Wieslaw Haladaj recalls these hidden values in a precise and distinctive but also genuine way.
Staying in a sense out-of-the-way, hę does not surrender to the up-to-date trends and artistic schools, devoting himself to risky search, less eagerly accepted though egually spectacular.
Dariusz Leśnikowski